PorcelainVeneersTransformRealHousewivesStarsSmileSpoiledbyTeethGrinding

Dorit Kemsley isn't shy. Best known to fans as an outspoken and sometimes outrageous cast member of the reality show Real Housewives of Beverly Hills, Kemsley is never reticent about “mixing it up” with fellow castmates or their significant others. Recently, though, she confessed to something that left her less than confident: her smile.

Kemsley has been self-conscious about her smile because her teeth looked noticeably short, worn down from an unconscious habit of grinding her teeth. Although teeth grinding is more common among children (who normally grow out of it by adolescence), it can persist into adulthood, usually from difficulties managing high stress (a likely component in the fashion designer/reality show star's busy life).

Stress-induced teeth grinding can occur during waking hours or, more likely, during deep sleep. The accumulating, long-term effects from the habit can lead not only to worn teeth but to weakened gum support, a high risk of tooth fracture or jaw pain and dysfunction.

So, how do you know if you grind your teeth, especially if it's only happening at night? Typical signs include sore jaws after awaking from sleep, increased tooth pain or sensitivity or, like Kemsley, a noticeable difference in your tooth length. Your family or sleeping partner may also complain about the “skin-crawling” noise you make during the night.

There are ways to lessen the effects of teeth grinding. The first step is to have us verify the underlying cause for the habit. If it's tension from stress, then you might reduce the habit's occurrences by learning better stress management or relaxation techniques through individual counseling, group support or biofeedback therapy. We can also fit you with a mouth guard to wear at night or through the day that reduces the force generated during teeth grinding.

And if you've already experienced accelerated tooth wear like Kemsley with a resultant “small teeth” smile, you might pursue the same solution as the RHOBH star: dental veneers. These thin, life-like wafers of porcelain are custom-made to mask imperfections like chips, staining, slight tooth gaps and, yes, worn teeth.

Veneers are often less expensive and invasive than other cosmetic techniques, yet they can have a transformative effect, as Kemsley's Instagram followers have seen. In conjunction with other dental treatments needed to repair any underlying damage caused by a grinding habit, veneers are an effective fix for the smile you present to the world.

If you suspect you may have a grinding habit, see us for a complete examination. From there, we'll help you protect your teeth and your smile.

If you would like more information on teeth grinding habits and their effects, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teeth Grinding.”

By Implant Dentistry of Fort Myers
February 18, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition  
KeepaLidonSugarThisHolidayforHealthierTeethandGums

During this time of year, many of us dust off traditional family recipes and make our favorite holiday treats. There is, however, a small price to pay for all that nostalgic goodness in the shape of a few extra pounds to deal with in the new year. We may also be increasing the risk for something even more unpleasant: tooth decay.

The main cause, of course, is a certain carbohydrate integral to many holiday goodies: sugar.  We humans love it, but so do oral bacteria that readily devour any sugar lingering in our mouth after eating. This fuels bacterial reproduction, which in turn increases the production of acid that softens tooth enamel.

There are a number of strategies you can follow to reduce this effect. You can remove sugar completely from your holiday preparations—and risk family and friends “voting you off the island.” Or, you can try these tips for easing the impact of holiday sugar on your dental health.

Look for ways to reduce sugar. Just because you're not throwing the sugar bowl out the window doesn't mean you have to go all out using it. Instead, try to modify older recipes (or look for newer versions) to decrease the amount of sugar in candies and baked goods. You may also consider alternative sweeteners like sucralose that tolerate high baking temperatures.

Balance savory with sweet. Not all holiday treats need to be sweet—you can add items that take advantage of more savory seasonings. For example, try offering up popcorn with a sprinkling of cinnamon or other holiday spice, or a creative assortment of cheeses (which in turn promote saliva flow to neutralize acid).

Combine treats with mealtimes. Continuous snacking may be part of the holiday tradition, but it can also raise the risk for tooth decay. Acidity increases when we eat, but saliva normally neutralizes it within thirty minutes to an hour. However, saliva can get overwhelmed during continuous snacking, resulting in longer periods of high acidity that damages tooth enamel. Instead, try to combine snack times with mealtimes.

Don't neglect your oral hygiene. Even though things can get hectic during the holidays, make a point of keeping up daily brushing and flossing. Regular hygiene keeps dental plaque, a thin film of harmful bacteria and food particles (including sugar), from building up on your teeth. Reducing plaque lowers your overall decay risk. Attention to oral health through your day-to-day dental hygiene routine along with regular professional cleanings and checkups is the best thing you can do to avoid dental disease.

The holidays should be a joyous time for you and your family. They can also be a healthy time for your teeth and gums, if you minimize the role of sugar in your holiday treats.

If you would like more information about boosting your dental health, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Nutrition & Oral Health” and “The Bitter Truth About Sugar.”

By Implant Dentistry of Fort Myers
February 08, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dental implants  

Discover more about this tooth replacement option and how it can preserve your oral health.

Has tooth loss got you down? Perhaps you’re finally ready to take charge and to do something to change this. If so, our Fort Myers, FL, implant dentist Dr. Jay Shartzer can help! While there are many ways to replace missing teeth, many patients are turning to us for dental implants. This restoration offers some amazing and unique benefits that other tooth replacement options just can’t. Here are some of the biggest benefits associated with dental implants,

Protect Against Bone Loss

Bone loss is a complication of untreated tooth loss. Since the roots are no longer able to stimulate the jawbone, the jawbone loses its density and shape. This begins to happen immediately and can cause serious alterations to the health and shape of the jawbone in just one year after tooth loss; however, by having our Fort Myers, FL, dental team place an implant not long after losing a tooth, the implant can prevent future bone loss.

Improve Your Appearance

Did you know that getting a dental implant could make you look younger? Not only because it fills the gaps in your smile and enhances your smile’s overall esthetic, but also because it protects the bone from deteriorating, which also supports the muscles of the face to prevent unnecessary sagging and wrinkles.

Eat What You Love

Who doesn’t love to eat? However, if you’re dealing with tooth loss then you know all too well just how challenging that can be. It can be difficult to properly chew your food, which can also cause digestive problems. Fortunately, dental implants function and feel just like real teeth, which means that you can eat all the foods you love that you might not have been able to before your implant.

Enjoy Your Smile Forever

Once a dental implant fuses with the jawbone, this is a restoration you should have for the rest of your life. As long as you continue to maintain good oral hygiene and proper care for your smile, your implants can last decades and the implant itself should never need to be replaced.

Do you have questions about dental implants? Want to sit down with our Fort Myers, FL, dentist to find out if you are right for implants? If so, it’s the perfect time to schedule an appointment with us. Call today at (239) 275-8880.

By Implant Dentistry of Fort Myers
February 08, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
GoodOralHealthStartsEarly

February is Children's Dental Health Month—the perfect time to talk about the oral health of the little ones in your family. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, one out of every five children ages 5 to 11 has at least one untreated cavity. Although this statistic may not seem terribly significant given that primary teeth fall out anyway, dental disease is a concern even for kids.

Just as with adult teeth, baby teeth are needed for eating, speaking and smiling. Besides these obvious functions, primary teeth serve a crucial role as placeholders for the corresponding permanent teeth. If they are lost early, the adult teeth could come in crooked, crowded or out of place, increasing the chances of needing complex and costly treatment later. And because the enamel on primary teeth is thinner than that of permanent teeth, baby teeth are more vulnerable to decay, which can spread quickly—both to the inside of the tooth and to neighboring teeth. Decaying teeth can cause pain, which may interfere with getting proper nutrition. In addition, children with poor dental health are more likely to miss school and are much more likely to suffer from decay in their permanent teeth.

Fortunately, many dental problems can be avoided by following a few guidelines:

Instill good oral hygiene habits in your child. Teach children to brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and, when they are old enough, to floss once a day. (A handheld flosser can make flossing easier for young ones.) Preventing dental disease through good daily habits can save a lot of trouble down the line.

Offer nutritious foods. For healthy teeth and a healthy body, encourage your child to make nutritious food choices. Instead of sugary snacks, opt for fruits, vegetables and cheese. And choose plain water instead of soda, fruit juice or sweetened beverages.

Keep up with regular checkups and cleanings. The world's health focus has been all about COVID-19 and in an effort to isolate as much as possible some parents may have put off routine dental checkups for their children. However, it is important for the dental team to monitor the health of little mouths to keep small problems from turning into bigger, potentially painful ones. When it comes to infection control, dental professionals go above and beyond the minimum requirements to protect you and your loved ones. We are committed to a higher standard, following protocols that help ensure your health and safety.

Talk with us about preventive treatments. During your child's visit, ask whether a topical fluoride treatment or dental sealants are recommended. These affordable ways to help prevent cavities can benefit many children.

The key to healthy smiles for life is to start early. A good day-to-day dental hygiene habit along with healthy food choices and regular dental checkups can set your child on the course for a lifetime of good oral health.

If you would like more information about how to maintain your child's dental health, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dentistry & Oral Health for Children.”

By Implant Dentistry of Fort Myers
January 29, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: sensitive teeth  
TipsforWinterToothSensitivity

If a breath of crisp winter air makes you say, “Ouch!” you're not alone. According to a study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association, one of every eight people suffers from tooth sensitivity. And for those individuals, winter can be a particularly challenging time of year.

Tooth sensitivity can result when the inner part of the tooth, called dentin, is exposed. Dentin is normally protected by enamel above the gum line and cementum below, but if the protective coating is lost, then temperature, pressure and acid from food and drinks can activate the nerves inside the tooth.

If you suffer from tooth sensitivity, these tips may help:

Avoid acidic foods and beverages. It may be common sense to stay away from foods and drinks that are hot or cold enough to make you wince, but also avoid those that are acidic, as acid can erode tooth enamel and increase tooth sensitivity.

Wait an hour to brush your teeth. After consuming acidic food or beverages, give your saliva time to neutralize the acid and strengthen the enamel surface to prevent erosion.

Brush gently. Gums can recede due to over-aggressive brushing, exposing sensitive tooth roots. So brush your teeth gently with a soft-bristled toothbrush and rinse with lukewarm water.

Use toothpaste for sensitive teeth. Toothpaste that is specially formulated for sensitive teeth blocks the pores in the tooth's surface where sensitivity can occur. It may also to help to rub the toothpaste on sensitive areas.

Sometimes, however, sensitive teeth result from dental problems that need professional treatment in the form of an at-home prescription, an in-office treatment like bonding or sealants, or a procedure like a gum graft or root canal. Accordingly, here's the most important tip of all:

Schedule a dental appointment. In an exam, we can look for the cause of your tooth sensitivity so it can be treated properly. Sensitivity may result from receding gums, tooth decay, erosion of the enamel, or other dental problems, such as the following:

  • Tooth-grinding. If we detect signs of a nighttime tooth grinding habit that you may not even be aware of, we may recommend a nightguard to wear while sleeping.
  • A root infection. If your tooth remains sensitive 30 seconds after eating or drinking something hot or cold, the pulp inside your tooth may be damaged. You may need root canal therapy to remove the infection and stop it from spreading.
  • A cracked tooth. A crack in a tooth may not be visible due to its size or location, but a compromised tooth surface can cause sensitivity and could lead to bigger problems if not treated.

Don't let tooth sensitivity get you down this winter. Come see us so we can discuss the right treatment for you.

If you would like to know more about treating sensitive teeth, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treatment of Tooth Sensitivity.”





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